PetSafe Fence Is Safe And Humane

16 08 2009

The PetSafe fence is safe and humane for all dogs or cats that weigh over 9 pounds, though it is predominantly used for dogs. The PetSafe fence is one of the best containment fences you can get. The reality is that an invisible PetSafe fence is very humane.

There are many different types of PetSafe Fences to suit different dogs and different containment areas. Because of all these variations, you may wonder which one is the most suitable for what it is you want to do, well we will help you through the PetSafe fence maze in this article. You can get an indoor and outdoor PetSafe fence, and you can get an outdoor fence which is either wireless or uses a wire. Your first option must be the simplest, and that is to choose whether you want an indoor PetSafe fence or an outdoor. If you want an indoor fence then you go for a wireless fence, if you want an outdoor then there are a number of items to take into consideration. There are three outdoor PetSafe Fence products; stubborn dog, deluxe and the standard model. It is one of the most powerful fences on the market. You can contain an area up to ten acres with this fence, all you need to do is buy more wire to extend it as the basic product only covers up to a third of an acre. This PetSafe fence can contain an area the same size as the stubborn fence but much less than the 25 acres for the deluxe model, hence the containment area is only 10 acres. You need to be careful because not all wireless fence products are safe.

You can get an indoor and outdoor PetSafe fence, and you can get an outdoor fence which is either wireless or uses a wire. If you want an indoor fence then you go for a wireless fence, if you want an outdoor then there are a number of items to take into consideration. The PetSafe wireless fence covers an area in diameter up to 180 feet. If you want simplicity and very fast setup then go for the wireless fence, if you need to cover a very large area, and you want a specific shaped boundary then you need the underground fence. PetSafe Wireless FenceYou need to be careful because not all wireless fence products are safe. PetSafe and Innotek have both developed a wireless fence which can be used indoors or outdoors. A wireless fence will ensure your dog is not able to jump over your fence or to dig under it. If you have the problem of your dog escaping from your back yard, an alternative to a wireless fence is the normal 6ft high panel fence, how much does that cost. Training your pet dog to turn a blind eye to things happening outside the wireless fence is one the things that makes this training so special. The other option to a wireless fence is the underground dog fence.

PetSafe and Innotek have both developed a wireless fence which can be used indoors or outdoors. There are three outdoor PetSafe Fence products; stubborn dog, deluxe and the standard model. Sometimes, the PetSafe product needs troubleshooting to resolve occasional problems with the collar or transmitter. Replace the batteries in the PetSafe collar. Trim the fur around the pet’s neck to increase the effectiveness of the collar’s static shock if your pet does not respond to the PetSafe product. If you get a PetSafe invisible dog fence then you will also get a comprehensive set of instructions. Innotek only makes one system and it is a general purpose one, where as PetSafe manufactures 3 types for 3 different applications. When it comes to the back yard, PetSafe manufactures an outdoor wireless fence, which Innotek have yet to do. The reality is that an invisible PetSafe fence is very humane. If a dog does escape it runs the risk of being run over if it gets out on the road and I have heard some people who get into a lot of hot water because their dogs escape and chase other pets or farm animals. When you study how a wireless or underground PetSafe fence works, you will understand how humane they are.

There are many different types of PetSafe Fences to suit different dogs and different containment areas. It is one of the most powerful fences on the market. The PetSafe fence is one of the best containment fences you can get. They hear things like shock collars and electric shock fences, which sound very painful. The good news is that these invisible dog fences are a piece of cake to get up and running. PetSafe produces a wide range of fences to suit the many different types of dog’s and your requirements. There are different fences for different applications. If you are looking for a dog fence you will be pleased to know that the modern dog fences are very simple to install.

The boundary area can be extended by adding additional transmitters and placing them at a strategic distance apart. If you want simplicity and very fast setup then go for the wireless fence, if you need to cover a very large area, and you want a specific shaped boundary then you need the underground fence. It covers boundary flag awareness, distraction phase and unleashed supervision. The system works with three parts: the transmitter, boundary wire, and dog collar. The transmitter with a fence sends radio signals to the boundary wire. If the dog is too close to the boundary of the fence, the collar will emit a beep. If the dog ignores the beep and keeps going toward the boundary, it will receive a mild electronic correction. Some electronic dog fence units have several levels of correction so correction levels will intensify as the dog gets closer to the boundary. If the boundary wire breaks, an alarm on the transmitter will sound to let you know. Play with your dog well away from the boundary and just have a bit of fun with him.

When multiple dogs are using a fence from Petsafe, they all must wear collars designed for that system so every dog receives appropriate correction.

The PetSafe fence is one of the best containment fences you can get. The reality is that an invisible PetSafe fence is very humane. by: Jeffrey New
PetSafe Wireless Instant Fence Pet Containment System

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Happy Cats At Home

6 08 2009

Table Of Contents of this Free E Book
1. Giving Your Cat A Pill
2. An In Depth Look At Siamese Cats
3. Caring For Persian Cats
4. Cats And Feline Diabetes
5. Cats And Ring Worm
6. Cats Bonding With Their Owners
7. Common Health Problems Of Cats
8. Common Meanings Of Cat Behavior
9. Curing Cat Bad Breath
10. Dealing With Cat Allergies
11. Pet Links and Resources
Do you really know what’s in your cat’s food?
Your cat eats the same food every day. The brand you feed is your cat’s main source of nutrition and vital to a long and healthy life. As a caring pet parent, it is important to see through clever marketing ploys when choosing a food worthy of your feline.
Although you may think all pet food manufacturers have your pet’s best interests in mind, this is not always the case. Some manufacturers use ingredients that you would never knowingly feed your cat. In fact, you may be shocked to learn what some brands of cat food really contain.
Life’s Abundance Premium Health Food is veterinarian-formulated with safe and wholesome ingredients, including a blend of vitamins and minerals, high-quality proteins, whole grains, an antioxidant system, green foods, omega fatty acids, calcium and phosophorus for healthy teeth and strong bones and dietary fiber to help maintain a healthy digestive tract. Life’s Abundance contains no artificial flavors or colors. And there’s no corn, corn gluten, wheat or wheat gluten.
Life’s Abundance Premium Health Food for Cats – 6.6lb Bag

    Free-E Book Happy Cats At Home click here for your copy.





When to Breed a Dog

5 08 2009

You have chosen the dog to breed and are just waiting for the perfect time but you need to know when to breed a dog? Know when to breed a dog!

The sixth month is typically when your female dog will begin to be in heat. However, every dog is different, some may begin being in heat in the 7th month or maybe even 8th. Nevertheless, another heat cycle will occur 6 months after their first heat cycle. Generally most breeders will wait for the females third cycle of being in heat before they will begin to breed. Typically the female would be around one and half years old and would be an adult that is ready to mate. Always consult your local veterinarian before deciding to allow your dog to mate.

One very important thing to do is make sure your dogs, male and female, are in the greatest of health. You have to make sure that all the necessary vaccinations and shots are up-to-date. Some veterinarians will recommend that your dogs be a diet of some sort. The advice given to you from your veterinarian should always be over anything you get from a book or the internet. Even so, the information from books and the internet are helpful and can create some questions for you to ask your vet.

There are certain signs to check to know when to breed a dog. One way is to check her vulva.One week before bleeding begins, her vulva should be swollen. It is very crucial to call the vet on the first day of the heat cycle. It is also very important to get the service of a vet if you want to have artificial insemination done. You vet should be located near you so they can easily reach you if you have an emergency.

Here are some more signs to know when to breed a dog. An addition sign of a female dog getting close to time for breeding is if she licks herself more than usual, this will also tell you when to breed a dog. Feeding her will also be harder. Another sign is flagging. Flagging is known as the time a female dog reaches or holds her tail off from one side. Personality and behavior changes are also a big sign.

If necessary, your veterinarian will do blood tests on your female dog to determine when she is most fertile. The male dog can also let you know if she is ready. Your male dog will probably check often to see if she is ready for mating.

The 12th day after your female dogs bleeding began she should be ready for breeding. This time, she will stand still for the male dog and her flow will slow down and change to a lightly pink color.

The Dog Breeder’s Guide to Successful Breeding and Health Management





Ragdoll Cat Keepers

11 07 2009

ragdoll-cat-facts-2Ragdoll cats are a large, semi-longhaired cat, exhibiting the pointed pattern in three varieties: color point, bicolor, and mitted. Ragdoll cats’ coat colors can be seal, blue, chocolate, and lilac point colors, either with or without markings on the face and feet. In some associations, they are also available in nontraditional colors, such as red (flame), torte and lynx point. The semi-long coats need minimal care and also do not usually become matted with regular combing.

Ragdoll cats typically take up to 4 years to fully mature physically. An adult Ragdoll male cat can weigh between 12 and 20 lb, while the female cats can weigh between 10 and 15 lb.
Characteristics and Temperament
Ragdolls (as their name implies) are extremely “laid-back,” docile, non-aggressive cats. They tend to relax when held. They are said to possess a non-fighting instinct, which means that if attacked, they do not defend themselves. They are very “people” oriented and love to be around others, which often finds them greeting guests and/or following their owners around in a fashion similar to a puppy. They are often quite an attraction in a show ring because of their docile dispositions and acceptance of the judge placing them on their backs, holding them like a baby, etc.
In general, Ragdolls are not extremely vocal, but they do voice their opinions concerning certain things (such as at mealtime!). Ragdolls are generally placid cats, but they do love to play with all types of toys and like to be involved in whatever “action” is going on.
Care and Training
Ragdolls are intelligent and like to please their owners. Training Ragdolls is much more successful when done with rewards. For example, they can be trained easily to use a scratching post instead of your furniture by lavishing attention on them whenever they use the post. As with most cats, however, Ragdolls can be their “own boss” if they so choose!
They do not shed excessively, and need little care to keep their coats in good condition. Their soft, rabbit-like fur does not tend to mat. The fur does require occasional combing or brushing, and the longer fur around the hindquarters should be combed regularly. In general, Ragdolls do not mind being groomed and, in fact, often enjoy the grooming sessions.
Because Ragdolls lack the instinct to defend themselves when attacked, they must be kept as indoor pets only. However, they can be easily leash trained so that they can go for walks with you outside.
Otherwise, good food, fresh water, regular vet-checkups, regular vaccinations and lots of love is what they need to thrive. Bits of fresh raw beef can also be fed, as it helps clean the teeth and gives good nutrients, but be *very* sure of your supplier before doing this!
In the early 1960’s, a woman from California named Ann Baker created the Ragdoll by breeding a white female Persian to a male Birman. She then introduced a female Burmese into the breeding program. This combination resulted in the Ragdoll breed. She then founded the IRCA organization in approximately 1971, which had very stringent “rules” for owners of her cats. The IRCA still exists, but Ragdolls produced by the IRCA are not accepted in any major association.
Fortunately, a husband and wife team bought a pair of the original IRCA Ragdolls and realized that this breed needed to be standardized, shown, and accepted by the various associations in the cat fancy. They worked on an extensive, selective breeding program, out of which grew the standardized Ragdolls. The Ragdoll Fanciers’ Club International (RFCI) was then formed to promote the breed and set specific guidelines for Ragdoll breeders.
RFCI Ragdolls are bred Ragdoll to Ragdoll only, with no outcrossing to any other breeds. They have specific breed standards, to which the breeders must adhere. RFCI Ragdolls are now accepted for registration in all cat registering associations.
RFCI Ragdolls have championship status in all associations except CFA. In CFA, the bi-colors may be shown in the miscellaneous class, and the colorpoint and mitted patterns can be registered but not shown. Ragdolls have done well in the associations in which they are accepted. The Number 1 Inter-American Alter for the 1992-93 show season in ACFA was a blue bi-color Ragdoll, which exemplifies the beauty and appeal of this breed.
The IRCA Ragdolls are not accepted in any association (except IRCA).
Breeders
You can contact the RFCI for more information on Ragdolls or for a list of registered RFCI breeders. You can also speak with breeders at cat shows. Ragdolls are more commonly seen at TICA or ACFA shows.
Ragdoll breeders are also listed in such magazines as “Cat Fancy” and “Cats Magazine”. Be cautious as to whether you are contacting an IRCA breeder or a breeder who produces the standardized, registerable (RFCI) Ragdolls. When looking at the breeders’ advertisements in periodicals such as “Cat Fancy” or “Cats Magazine,” note that the RFCI Ragdolls are listed with the other breeds, but the IRCA Ragdolls are listed in a separate area apart from the other breeds. To acquire a standardized, registerable Ragdoll, consult the RFCI breeders section.

http://www.thenicheclub.com





Book of Puppy Names

4 07 2009

With this little eBook, you’ll never be at a loss when trying to choose a
name for your new puppy. And, you don’t have to be a Pit Bull pup
owner to find a name for your puppy with this ebook. You can find a
name for any puppy or breed of puppy from inside these pages _.
As a matter of fact, you will see different dog breed images throughout
this ebook. So, this naming guide is for anyone and everyone who owns
a dog!
The names have been broken down into different sections and all the
names are listed in alphabetical order for easier searching. But, I
encourage you to consider any of the names from any section for your
new pup. BigBookofPuppyNames.pdf
Best Of Luck To You!





How to Build A Dog House

2 07 2009

Home improvement may extend beyond your house to that of your pet. The family dog needs a good place to escape from the weather, and unless you’re willing to let him in the house, maybe its time to work on that doghouse you’ve been meaning to build. Building a doghouse is a great family project. With these instructions a beginner level DIYer should be able to complete this project in a weekend, using common household tools.
TOOLS
• Circular saw
• Sabre saw
• Hammer
• Nails
• Glue
• Roof shingles (optional)
STEP 1
Cut out all the pieces as illustrated. Adjust the size of the opening on the front piece to fit your pet’s size. Draw an arch on the front piece and cut with a sabre saw.
STEP 2
Glue and nail cleats front & back pieces from the edges.
STEP 3
Glue and nail sides and bottom to cleats
STEP 4
Glue and nail roof to front & back, be sure the overhang is equal on all sides.
Use any type of roofing material you like.
TIP: If your cut is a little off on the roof angle, you can add a piece of trim underneath to hide it.
http://www.ronhazelton.com/archives/howto/doghouse_construction.shtm
http://www.ag.ndsu.nodak.edu/abeng/plans/6278.pdf
http://www.leeswoodprojects.com/dog_house.html
http://www.buildeazy.com/fp_doghouse.html

Doggie Homes (DIY): Barkitecture for Your Best Friend (DIY Network)





Pet Loss And Grief

26 06 2009

Within these few pages I have attempted to create a reference for those who have, or know
someone who has lost a pet. It is not meant as a “manual” on pet loss, as I feel there could be no
such thing. Everyone will experience the loss of their beloved pet differently, and attempting to
create a standard would be unjust.
Each of you will have different feelings at different times with regard to your loss. This is normal.
Shaming or depriving yourself isn’t healthy and should be avoided. If you feel as though it’s too
difficult for you to get through your grief alone, then by all means find someone who you feel
comfortable talking with. There is a list of resources at the end of this publication if you would like
to speak to someone trained in assisting you with your loss.
Most importantly, try to remember that you are not alone. There are thousands of pet lovers out
there who have gone through the loss of a pet and who understand it. I’ve lost several of my own
“fur babies” and it never gets any easier. However, I know that it is a part of life and always will
be. I can’t stop it, but I can also not let it stop me. This doesn’t mean that I will ever forget my
babies, but that I will carry their memory with me for all my days. And, when it’s my time and when
I cross the Rainbow Bridge, I’ll have a herd of sloppy, wet kisses waiting for me.
Take care of yourself. Hugs. Free E book PetLossGrief.pdf